Monthly Archives of: February 2014

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#todayistandup

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astile1

#todayistandup is a new series of selfies by attempt survivors on Instagram, thanks to Dese’Rae Stage of Live Through This. Dozens so far. Who’s next? And now …

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‘There’s such a need for this’

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This week, the Canadian activist who tweets at @unsuicide takes us on a tour through the online world of crisis response, where the suicide awareness establishment acknowledges it’s still largely clueless. In the conversation ahead: social media suicide hoaxes, what Twitter does wrong, the need for transparency, why hotlines are outdated, why trained peers are crucial, and how to walk the oh-so-careful law enforcement line between tracking people down for help and scaring them away.

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‘Out of the shadows’

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The TED site has posted this essay. And here’s some news:

American Association of Suicidology takes groundbreaking step to engage people who have been suicidal

Washington, D.C., Feb. 5, 2014. The suicide rate is estimated at one in about 10,000 people. For people who have survived a suicide attempt, the risk is far higher. Today, the American Association of Suicidology (AAS) is taking a crucial step to engage this significant population: It is working to create a new division that will give people with the lived experience of suicidal thinking a chance to have a stronger voice in the field of suicide awareness.

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‘A public health concern, not a criminal one’

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We have three videos for you this week. But first, a couple of examples of deeply unhelpful responses to suicidal thinking.

From Yale, here is the story of a student who was forced to formally withdraw from the Ivy League school. “As a result of my expulsion from the college, I was even more depressed when I left than when I was admitted,” she writes. And from Toronto, here is the story of a woman who was refused entry by a U.S. border official and later was asked by another, “Were you suicidal in the spring?” The Toronto Star story notes that a spokesman for the Royal Canadian Mounted Police “recently confirmed to the Star that information about Canadians who attempt or threaten suicide is filed by police services into the database and shared with the FBI and other agencies.”

The videos have a more empowering message.